18th Century Test Preparation

18th Century Test Preparation

To prepare for the test students should:

  • Have taken and completed the Native American Literature Test. Opportunities to retake this test, or show missing work, have officially passed as of this Friday.
  • Have written a one page reflection on the Steve Jobs Article or submitted their redo by now.
  • Have written their Creation Myth or turned in their redo.
  • Watched the following videos:
  • Create a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting the two civil rights leaders (MLK and Malcolm X). Afterwards, write a half page reflection on who was more effective at promoting their point of view and forming and argument. Why was one more effective than the other? What strategies did that person use?
  • Read the following:
  • Answered the following questions:
    • Plymouth Plantation:
      • a) What were some of the hardships the Pilgrims faced during their trip across the Atlantic and their first winter at Plymouth? b) Interpret - What do their troubles tell you about the climate and landscape of Plymouth?
      • a) Draw Conclusions - What message do you think Bradford is trying to convey in this narrative? b) Apply - How might the message have meaning for people today?
      • Hypothesize: In what ways might this account have been different if the Pilgrims had settled farther south?
      • Evaluate: Has this account changed your impression of the Pilgrims? Explain your answer.
      • How are the Pilgrims' values and beliefs evident in the ways they respond to problems? In your response, use at least two of these Essential Question words: just, commitment, gratitude, conviction. [Connecting to the Essential Question: What makes American literature American?]
    • Sinners:
      • a) According to the opening paragraph, what keeps sinners from falling into hell? b) Interpret - According to Edwards, what do his listeners mistakenly feel keeps them from falling into hell?
      • a) What words in the sermon's title suggest the emotional focus of Edwards's message? b) Analyze - What additional traits does Edwards attribute to God as the sermon progresses?
      • a) Toward the end of the sermon, what does Edwards say sinners can obtain? b) Analyze Cause and Effect - What must sinners do to obtain these things?
      • Given his purpose and the audience of worshipers to whom he spoke, do you think Edwards's sermon was effective? Why or why not?
      • This sermon played a significant role in reinvigorating Puritan faith during the 1740's. Why? State your opinion using at least two of these Essential Question words: powerful, beliefs, doctrine, faithful. [Connecting to the Essential Question: How does literature shape or reflect society?]
    • Virginia:
      • a) What measures does Henry say the colonists have already tried in their dealings with England? b) Analyze - What examples does he provide to support his position that compromise with the British is not a workable solution?
      • a) What course of action does Henry want the colonists to take? b) Draw Conclusions - What is Henry's answer to the objection that the colonists are not ready to fight the British?
      • a) Do you think Henry was prepared to stand behind his words when he exclaimed, "Give me liberty or give me death"? Why or why not? b) Deduce - what does his willingness to make such an assertion reveal about his character? c) Extend - If you had been in his place, would you have made such a statement? Why or why not?
      • Speculate - What types of people living in the colonies at the time of Henry's speech might have reacted negatively to his words? Why?
    • Benjamin Speech
      • Only notes are required for this reading.
    • Declaration
      • a) What points about human rights does Jefferson make at the beginning of the Declaration? b) Analyze - Why does he begin with these observations before addressing the colonists' situation?
      • a) Evaluate - What is the most convincing evidence that Jefferson cites to support his points? Explain. b) Evaluate - How would you rate the overall effectiveness of his argument? Why?
      • Synthesize - The period in which this document was written is often referred to as the Age of Reason because of the emphasis on logic and discipline at the time. What elements of Jefferson's Declaration reflect a faith in reason?
    • American Crisis:
      • a) In the first paragraph, how does Paine say the "summer soldier and the "sunshine patriot" will react to the American crisis? Why? b) Interpret - In that same paragraph, with what ideas does Paine justify the struggle of revolution?
      • a) In the third paragraph, what anecdote, or story, does Paine tell? b) Draw Conclusions - What point is Paine making by relating this anecdote?
      • Are the ideals Jefferson and Paine defend in these writings still important to Americans? Explain. In your response, use at least two of these Essential Question words: patriotism, service, authority, equality. [Connecting to the Essential Question: What makes American literature American?]
    • Wheatley:
      • a) In lines 9-12, how is Columbia described? b) Deduce- What does this image of Columbia suggest about the speaker's view of America?
      • a) In lines 13-20, to what natural phenomenon is the American army compared? b) Interpret - What does this comparison suggest about the power of American military forces in battle?
      • a) Which details in the last two lines reflect the influence of the British political system? b) Deduce - What position in a new government does the speaker assume Washington will occupy? c) Synthesize - How do these details hint at the debate about the kind of government to be established after the war?
      • Do the qualities Wheatley attributes to Washington represent typically American values? In your response, use at least two of these Essential Question vocabulary words: valor, boldness, principles, character. [Connecting to the Essential Question: What makes American literature American?]
    • Benjamin Autobiography:
      • a) What efforts does Franklin make to become more orderly? b) Infer - Is he successful? Explain. c) Analyze - What aspect of his attempt to become more orderly is illustrated by the anecdote of the man with the speckled ax?
      • a) When Franklin began his project, he was a young man. How do you think he felt at the time about his chances of attaining moral "perfection"? b) Compare and Contrast: What insights does Franklin gain about the goal of achieving perfection as he gets older?
      • a) Note three aphorisms that deal directly with friendship. b) Analyze - Is Franklin's message about friendship consistent? Explain.
      • a) According to the aphorism, what happens to a person who "lives upon hope"? b) Speculate - What more reliable value would Franklin say a person can successfully "live upon"?
      • In what ways can analyzing one's own behavior contribute to personal growth?
      • With which of Franklin's aphorisms do you most strongly agree and disagree? Why?
      • In what ways do the goals Franklin sets for himself and the aphorisms he wrote express values that are still widely held in America? Explain. Use at least two of these Essential Question words: individualism, thrifty, practical, humorous. [Connecting to the Essential Question: What makes American literature American?]
Ghost Chapter Assignment

Ghost Chapter Assignment